The transition journey from age 14

Our Transition team will help you and the young person understand the journey of moving from children’s to adult services.  They will do this by providing information, advice and guidance on the transition process including reviews, assessments, meetings and interviews that take will place during various stages.

On this page we have outlined the journey that a young person will take. Some of these are legal requirements to ensure that the young person and their family are involved in the transition as much as possible. This also helps us to ensure that the care being delivered is appropriate for the young person’s individual needs.

Education transitions pathway

Education pathway age 14 (Year 9)

Education Health Care Plan (EHCP) will be amended in year 9, in collaboration with the Special Needs Assessment Service (SNAS) 14-25 Review Team to incorporate the Preparing for Adulthood (PfA) outcomes. Other professionals will also prioritise this transitional year to update the advice contributing to the plan. 

Review of support in school for those with additional needs but no EHCP.

Parents and young person fact-find about post 16 provision, referring to Local Offer.

Schools and colleges should provide students with independent careers advice (all year 8-13 pupils) and offer opportunities for taster sessions, work experience, mentoring and inspirational speakers/role models to help young people with SEND make informed decisions about their future aspirations. If your child has an EHC plan, their EHC Co-ordinator will also be involved in this process.

Adult Social Care services work with SNAS team to review young people who may be eligible for care services as an adult.

Education pathway age 15 (Year 10)

Year 10 Annual Review - Preparing for adulthood is an ongoing process and the Year 10 annual review is the second of several transition/planning meetings that takes place every year with the young person until they leave school in Year 11 or Year 14. Through the transition the annual review will help to ensure that the child’s needs are identified, and relevant services put in place. The EHCP will be amended when required, to reflect their changing needs as they grow older.

Review of support in school for those with additional needs but no EHCP. 

The setting will provide careers guidance, information and advice. 

If they are likely to have a change of environment post-16 e.g., move from school to college, consider what might be needed for a smooth transition. In some complex cases a multi-agency panel will consider the options and make recommendations.

Adult Social Care referral for transition to be considered, timeliness for assessment taken into consideration.

Education pathway age 16 (Year 11)

EHCP reviewed and new outcomes recorded on Preparing for Adulthood section.

Continue to receive careers education, information, advice and guidance. 

Young person decides on preferred post-16 option, this should have been undertaken and preparations underway prior to the annual review. In the autumn young people are asked for their post-16 education placement choices.  SNAS then “consult” with the relevant education placement. The SNAS team attend this along with social care and health when appropriate. This process is repeated at year 12,13 and 14. 

If moving on from school, post 16 placement confirmed by 31 March if an EHCP is in place.

Consider whether all appropriate professionals / organisations are involved (including advocacy).

SNAS should refer young people to Adult Social Care who have been identified on the tracker when not known to CWD/FSt.

Young people preparing to make their own decision: 

As young people develop, they should be involved more and more closely in decisions about their own future. After compulsory school age (the end of the academic year in which they turn 16) children become young people and take their own responsibility for engaging in decision making with their education provider and, where they have an EHCP, with the local authority and other agencies.

Schools have a vital role to play in supporting young people to make decisions and take control of their own future. It is essential that parents are well prepared for these changes and supported to allow their child’s voice to be heard at the centre of the conversation. Educational providers should continue to involve parents in discussions about the young person’s future. In focusing discussions around the individual young person, parents, carers and professionals should support that young person to communicate their needs and aspirations and to make decisions which are most likely to lead to good outcomes for them, involving the family in most cases. It is key that the child’s aspirations are at the centre of the conversation. Using Vocational Profiles as a tool will help with this work.

The parents and family members of young people can continue to support them to make decisions
or act on their behalf if this is what the young person wants.

The local authority, schools, colleges, health services and other agencies should continue to involve parents until the young person is 18 years old, although the final decision lies with the young person.

Education pathway age 17 (Year 12)

Families and young person discuss potential post 19 options with school, key workers, social care and health workers.

All students aged 16 to 19 should follow a study programme that stretches them, prepares them for adulthood, and supports their progression into work or further study. For students who have an EHCP, a study programme can apply up to the age of 25.

Young people with an EHCP can undertake supported internships or traineeships which aim to prepare them for employment or apprenticeships.

The annual review will be used as a mechanism to facilitate joint planning with the family, particularly around preparation for adulthood and transition to adult services.  

Education pathway age 18 (Year 13)

The annual review will be used as a mechanism to facilitate joint planning with the family, particularly around preparation for adulthood and transition to adult services.  

Personalised planning is in place which will consider:

  • The content of any future study programme and how it will enable outcomes to be achieved.
  • Which professionals to be involved in future meetings.

For those moving between provisions, e.g. vocational pathways, college, university, at the end of year 13, the SNAS team will liaise with the family to identify next steps and amend/cease the plan as appropriate. 

Mental Capacity Act ensure that the young person has support to make informed decisions.

Education pathway age 19+ (Year 14+)

The annual review will be used as a mechanism to facilitate joint planning with the family, particularly around preparation for adulthood and transition to adult services.  There will be a particular focus on destination planning and identifying the steps to get there. 

For those moving between provisions, e.g. vocational pathways, college, university and employment, at the end of year 14, the SNAS 14-25 review team will liaise with the family to identify next steps and amend / cease the plan as appropriate.

Mental Capacity Act ensure that the young person has support to make informed decisions.

Identify other key transition points in the young person’s journey – consider actions required to make these transitions as smooth as possible.

Ensure that all the services are actively involved in the annual review process. If the EHCP is ceased, sufficient exit plan arrangements are in place to secure appropriate provision and outcomes.

Social care transitions pathway

Social care pathway age 14 (Year 9)

Young people likely to need support as adults should be flagged on to the tracking list and discussed at the regular meetings, the purpose of which is to ensure that that key pieces of work are completed and that they are on the right pathway for their needs.

Adult Social Care service will work with other teams to identify young people with EHCPs who are likely to require support from adult support services.

Social care pathway age 15 (Year 10)

Tracking meetings continue between the relevant teams on a regular basis. Young people can be flagged and added at any point.

Social care pathway age 16 (Year 11)

Referrals are made to Adult Social Care for young people already identified on the tracker by the relevant teams in Children’s Services (0-25, SNAS, CLA).

It may be appropriate for some people with complex needs to be referred at an earlier stage, this will be decided at the tracking meetings.

Social care pathway age 17 (Year 12)

Young people referred are allocated to a social worker in the Preparing for Adulthood (PfA) section of the 0-25 team for completion of the Care Act assessment. A care and support plan will be developed, taking into account the young person’s strengths, abilities and wishes and a funding application submitted to the Preparing for Adulthood Panel, no later than 3 months before the 18th birthday.

A mental capacity assessment will also be completed if there are concerns that the young person lacks capacity to make decisions about their care and support.

It may be appropriate for some people with complex needs to be assessed at an earlier stage. This will be decided at the tracking meetings.

Social care pathway age 18 (Year 13)

Case management responsibility transfers to a social worker in the PfA Team of the 0-25 Disability Service.

If there is a delay in the transition to the PfA Team, support from Children’s Services should continue to ensure continuity. If the pathway is followed, this should not be necessary.

The adult care and support package starts on the young person’s 18 birthday, taking into account the young person’s strengths, abilities and wishes and this is reviewed after six weeks and annually thereafter.

Social care pathway age 25

Young people transition to the relevant adult social care team. Young people with physical and sensory disabilities will transfer to the adult locality team; those with a learning  disability to the learning disability team; those with a mental health need to the mental health team. Decisions about the most appropriate team will be made on a case-by-case basis for young people who do not fit neatly into a specific team.

The young person’s care and support plan will be kept under review to ensure the person is supported to live as independently as possible.

Children looked after transitions pathway

Children looked after pathway age 14 (Year 9)

Children Looked After (CLA) and Future First (FF) identify young people who are likely to need support from Adult Social Care (typically those with a disability or mental illness) and they are placed on the tracker.

Independent Reviewing Officer (IRO) also helps to identify young people with care and support needs.

Children looked after pathway age 15 (Year 10)

Young people will be supported to complete the Independent Living Checklist, this will be reviewed periodically and will inform the pathway plan. The checklist will also be completed as soon as possible for any young people who become looked after between 15-18.

Young people who will need a Personal Advisor (PA) at 16 are also identified.

Children looked after pathway age 16 (Year 11)

The First Pathway Plan is completed before young person turns 16 and three months.

Young people are allocated an FF PA on or before their 16th birthday.

Young person’s case is presented to the 16+ panel for the first time.

Young people likely to require Adult Social Care support are referred for a Care Act assessment (These young people will already be on the tracker in keeping with the Social Care Pathway).

The first joint visit takes place between the social worker and PA and dates of CLA reviews and Personal Education Plan (PEP) meetings are shared.

Children looked after pathway age 17 (Year 12)

Young people will have been presented at the post-16 panel at least twice by this stage to track the transition planning.

Pathway Plans are reviewed, and transition targets updated.

The PA will meet the young person at least four times before their 17th birthday.

Post 18 accommodation plans should be developing, including Staying Put arrangements by age 17 and six months

Post 18 accommodation plans are in place and approved by the Care Panel.

Young people should have been presented at least three times to monitor transition planning.

Young people have a clear 18+ support network via lifelong links referral when needed.

Young people complete a life skills course.

Care Act assessments will be completed for those referred.

Children looked after pathway age 18 (Year 13)

Young people are presented to the 16+ panel for the last time one month before their 18th birthday. The panel checks that all necessary handover tasks for the move to FF have been completed.

The care package will commence for young people eligible for support from Adult Social Care under the Care Act.

Young people transfer to the FF team at an agreed date.

Health transitions pathway

Health pathway age 14 (Year 9)

Young people with complex health needs are flagged up on the tracker as likely to need/be eligible for adult Continuing Healthcare (CHC).

The Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and 0-25 team meet every 3 months to track these young people.

From age 14, young people with a learning disability are entitled to a free Health Check with their GP once per year.

Health pathway age 15 (Year 10)

Quarterly meetings continue between 0-25 team and CCG to track those with complex health needs and to ensure their needs are understood.

Health pathway age 16 (Year 11)

The relevant young people on the tracker are referred / screened using the CHC Checklist. Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) Learning Disability (LD) Team will contribute to this process for the relevant young people.

It may be appropriate for some people with complex needs to be referred at an earlier stage, this will be decided at the tracking meetings.

Health pathway age 17 (Year 12)

Those with a positive CHC Checklist will have a full assessment to determine eligibility in principle (because
they will not yet be 18).

For those eligible, needs will be assessed, and care commissioned in time for their 18th birthday.

The transitions coordinator from CAMHS supports young people prior to turning 18 to ensure they will get the correct support from adults services.

For young people requiring ongoing support, whether due to mental health needs, a learning disability, an eating disorder, a personality disorder, a CAMHS Care Coordinator will begin discussions with the relevant adults team when the young person turns 17 and make referrals as needed.

Referrals will include information on current medication relevant health assessments, EHCPs, risk assessments, and key contacts in the network. Once referred and accepted young people will be allocated a lead healthcare professional from adult services to help facilitate the transition.

Active transition planning should start when the young person is 17 and 6 months. This should be agreed by CAMHS and the relevant adults team. Young people supported by the CAMHS Learning Disability Team will typically be referred to the appropriate learning disability service.

Some young people supported by CAMHS may not meet the criteria for adult services in such cases CAMHS may explore referrals to other organisations / agencies, this work will take place when the young person is 17 years and 6 months.

When young people are 17+ and have had a first episode of psychosis requiring a Care Programme Approach (CPA) to support their recovery, CAMHS may arrange handover of treatments to the adult early intervention service.

Young people who are in-patient on a CAMHS ward may need to transition to an adult ward when they turn 18, preparation for this should begin as early as possible in line with CPA policy. The relevant adult ward and/or community team will be invited to arrange transition.

Health pathway age 18 (Year 13)

Eligible young people transition to adults CHC and the care package starts. This will be reviewed after three months and annually thereafter by adults CHC.

When CAMHS are providing time limited intervention this may continue beyond the 18th birthday in agreement with the relevant adult health team. In this instance CAMHS and the relevant adult service will co-work for a limited period and this will be reviewed at the CPA.

Once the adult team takes over care coordination, advice can still be sought
from CAMHS.

Transport transitions pathway

Transport pathway age 14 (Year 9)

We expect young people to travel independently when they have the skills to do so and will support those who don’t to develop them wherever possible. Young people in receipt of support from SEN Travel Assistance Team will be considered for independent travel training. Travel Assistance Budgets remain available to young people and their families.

Transport pathway age 15 (Year 10)

Independent travel training will continue to be considered for the young people to support them to develop the skills they need to travel independently wherever possible.

Transport pathway age 16 and 17 (Year 11 and 12)

In Year 11, planning will take place for post-16 preparation for either sixth form or college, with the expectation that young people will either engage with independent travel training or will be able to access a travel assistance budget. Young people with significant SEN may be considered for ongoing transport support.

Transport pathway age 18 (Year 13)

The SEN Travel Assistance Team will give a year’s notice to inform young people that travel assistance will end when they leave school.

Young people in receipt of support from Adult Social Care may be able to get support for transport / travel training as part of their care and support package to attend school or college and other community activities.

Transport pathway age 19+ (Year 14+)

Travel support to school from the SEN Travel Assistance Team will cease at the end of Year 14.

Young people in receipt of support from Adult Social Care may be able to get travel support as part of their care package to attend school or college and other community activities.