Tunnelling work completed on tube extension to Battersea

Published: Friday 10th November 17

The extension of the Northern Line to Nine Elms and Battersea reached a major milestone this week with the completion of tunnelling work.

The tunnel boring machine, Amy, broke through at Kennington, which means that the two 3.2km tunnels from Battersea Power Station, via Nine Elms, have now been built.

Since their launch in the spring, Amy and sister tunnelling machine Helen have been working around the clock to create the north and southbound tunnels that will extend the Charing Cross branch of the Northern line.

The extension, targeted for completion in 2020, is the first major extension to a Tube line since the Jubilee line in the late 1990s.

It will add vital new capacity to the Capital’s transport network, bringing Battersea to within 15 minutes of the City and the West End. It will also enable the regeneration of the Vauxhall, Nine Elms and Battersea areas, spurring economic growth by supporting around 25,000 new jobs and more than 20,000 new homes.

Two new stations are being built in the borough Nine Elms station in Pascal Street and Battersea Power Station on Battersea Park Road next to the Power Station development. These will serve new developments such as the US Embassy, the Power Station and the redevelopment of New Covent Garden Market, as well as existing communities.

The leader of Wandsworth Council, Ravi Govindia, said: “This is a real milestone in London’s first new Tube line extension for almost 20 years. This is an extremely important project, not just for the borough but the whole Capital, and Wandsworth has put in a lot of time and effort to shape the unique funding package that has taken us to where we are today. 

“Working with the private sector we are now seeing our hard work come to fruition and the tunnelling machine breaking ground is a tangible reminder that the Tube extension will soon be a reality, transforming the fortunes of north Battersea and making the Nine Elms regeneration programme one of the greatest sources of new jobs and homes in the country.”

A conveyor system was used to take more than 300,000 tonnes of excavated earth to barges on the River Thames where it was transported to Goshems Farm in East Tilbury, Essex, saving thousands of lorry journeys from the Capital’s roads. The earth has been used to create arable farmland.

The cutter head of both machines will now be lifted by crane out of the shafts at Kennington while the rest of the machines will travel back to Battersea and be lifted, in parts, out of the ground there.

Work on the new stations at Battersea and Nine Elms is progressing well and services on the Northern line have continued uninterrupted while the work has taken place.

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Recent comments

Why was this not connected to Clapham Junction station?
J Burns

10 November 2017