Comment on services for children with autism

Published: Thursday 14th March 19

Wandsworth wants to hear the views of all families with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), or who are in the process of getting a diagnosis, about proposed changes to the support they are offered.

The number of children diagnosed with ASD has grown significantly in recent years. In 2010 the number of children in Wandsworth with a diagnosis was 495. This year the number has climbed to 1,205.

Plans to better meet this growing demand have been drawn up following wide-ranging discussions with parents, teachers, educational psychologists and NHS professionals. Councillors gave their backing to the changes last month and agreed that a fresh round of consultation should be held.

See all support for families with disabilities

The borough’s support services for children with ASD are currently split into two distinct components – one that supports the under-fives and another that supports older children. Under the new proposals they would be combined to offer a new integrated service, with better communication between teams, better longer-term planning and less chance of children falling through the gap between the two services.

The proposals are intended to provide more support and a single point of access to families from initial identification of concerns through to support after diagnosis, including at times of crisis. The new multi-professional, all-age advisory service would provide support to families and education settings on a year-round basis, with no gaps during the school holidays. 

Children’s services spokesman Cllr Sarah McDermott said: “These plans are based on feedback from extensive consultation of families and professionals. We would now like to hear again from families about what they think of the proposed changes. We believe it’s vital that we take into account the views of the people who will be directly affected.”

Find out more and take the online consultation here.

Families are also invited to find out more about the proposals at one of a series of drop-in sessions. Just turn up.

  • Monday March 18, 1.30pm-3pm - Eastwood Children’s Centre, 168 Roehampton Lane
  • Tuesday March 19, 6:30pm to 8pm – The Early Years Centre, 1 Siward Road
  • Friday March 22, 10.30am-12noon – The Early Years Centre, 1 Siward Road.
  • Monday March 25, 12.30pm to 2pm –Yvonne Carr Childrens Centre, Thessaly Road
  • Saturday March 30, 10am-11.30am - The Early Years Centre, 1 Siward Road. 

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Recent comments

This proposal does not provide a post 19 service , despite EHCP provision expiring at 25. Are you able to explain why this is? Wandsworth has poor needs appropriate provision for young autistic adults. Incorporating under 25s into the service means you will be able to support autistic people and families across a range of needs to prepare for adulthood, and to connect them to post 25 services that are more appropriate to their needs. Would welcome the inclusion of specialist provision to diagnose and support autistic young women and girls. It would also be good to see specialism in co-occurring conditions, tying in with CAMHS and CMHT where appropriate, and linking to those able to diagnose and support plans young people with PDA et al.
Lindsey Ilsley

19 March 2019

This proposal does not provide a post 19 service , despite EHCP provision expiring at 25. Are you able to explain why this is? Wandsworth has poor needs appropriate provision for young autistic adults. Incorporating under 25s into the service means you will be able to support autistic people and families across a range of needs to prepare for adulthood, and to connect them to post 25 services that are more appropriate to their needs. Would welcome the inclusion of specialist provision to diagnose and support autistic young women and girls? It was also be good to see specialism in co-occurring conditions, tying in with CAMHS and CMHT where appropriate, and linking to those able to diagnose and support plans young people with PDA et al.
Lindsey Ilsley

19 March 2019