Green light for cycling contraflow pilot schemes

Published: Friday 15th June 18

Cyclists will soon be able to take short cuts down one-way streets as part of a cycling contraflow pilot scheme in four parts of the borough.

Bicycles are to be permitted to access these one-way streets in both directions for the next 12 months while highway engineers evaluate the merits and advantages of making this a permanent change.

The four pilot schemes are to operate from later this month in Candahar Road in Battersea, Trinity Crescent in Tooting, Furmage Street, Earlsfield and Temperley Road, Balham.   

Residents in these streets were consulted about the proposals in the spring of last year and all have now been written to again to inform them that trial is about to commence.

All will all have additional signage and carriageway markings to ensure that both cyclists and other road users and pedestrians are informed of the changes.

The four have been chosen carefully on the grounds of safety. They all have low volumes of vehicle traffic, have undergone safety audits and have been approved following consultations with local traffic police.

Transport spokesman Cllr Jonathan Cook said: “This scheme is part of a wider package of measures to encourage people to take to two wheeled travel. There are clear health and air quality benefits if we can get more residents to take up this non-polluting form of transport.

“We have recently worked alongside Transport for London to install a series of Quietways on key routes through the borough. These incorporate streets that have less traffic and are designed to encourage people who are less confident on two wheels to get back on the saddle.

“And we have just reached agreement with dockless bike hire company ofo to begin operating across the borough.
“Approving a series of convenient short-cuts for cyclists via a contraflow system is just another way we are encouraging higher levels of bike travel in the borough.”

The ofo scheme will complement the existing Santander cycle hire scheme, which does not operate across the entire borough, and encourage more people to get out of their car and use clean, sustainable transport. It will support the objectives of the council’s Cycling Strategy and other council plans which aim for cycling to make up seven per cent of all trips by 2026. 

The contraflow cycling schemes will be implemented on a trial basis under an Experimental Traffic Order (ETO) for a period of 12 months.  The ETO allows for a substantial period of monitoring which will consider all aspects of the scheme including comments from residents, police and cycling groups before a decision is made on whether to make the scheme permanent.

 Make and view comments on this article



(This is only present to check if you a real person)



(Required)



(Required but not displayed on site)



(Required but not displayed with your comment. Used to help prevent spam.)



(Required)

 
(You can unsubscribe at any time)

  (Required)

 

You must carefully read and then agree to the Terms and Conditions before accessing the message board and posting a comment. If you do not wish to be bound by these Terms and Conditions, you may not access or use the message board.

If you wish to complain about a comment, contact us at press@wandsworth.gov.uk.

Recent comments

All over Wandsworth people are cycling down one way streets, across Zebra crossings, riding on the pavement and jumping Red traffic lights, just stand at the junction of Putney Bridge and Lower Richmond Road, and you will observe all of these offences within a few minutes,
RICHARD W

19 June 2018

Agree with everything Tom Corbett mentions. More of these schemes please. Our borough and city of London is so polluted and now so choked with traffic dealing with it, to reduce it, is a matter of urgency.The polluting car culture especially for short journeys making our high streets & neighbourhoods across London so unpleasant needs to change. London is a flat city, councils need to provide confidence to those & their children that want to cycle but lack the confidence because of the existing danger on the roads & lack of safe cycling lanes, segregated or otherwise.
Gill Allen

19 June 2018

This trial needs to be signposted MUCH better otherwise dangerous - the small blue signs are easy for car drivers to miss. Cars drive the one way section of Trinity Crescent quite quickly because very unlikely they will need to stop until the A24 junction. I cycled 'up' Trinity Crescent today and clear that car drivers treated me as though I was in the wrong, making no effort to move to the left to give me space. There isn't a huge amount of space on Trinity Crescent with car parking on both sides
Ian Paine

17 June 2018

I think this will cause more bike related accidents in the long run. Bikes already go the wrong way down our one-way street and it causes concern to vehicles and people on foot. I know this won't change anything and no matter what happens it will become borough wide but it seems cyclists get anything they want, and ignore all traffic signs and rules now so why not make it legal for them to do so.
David Hall

17 June 2018

I think this will cause more bike related accidents in the long run. Bikes already go the wrong way down our one-way street and it causes concern to vehicles and people on foot. I know this won't change anything and no matter what happens it will become borough wide but it seems cyclists get anything they want, and ignore all traffic signs and rules now so why not make it legal for them to do so.
David Hall

17 June 2018

What about the short section of Byrne Road where it meets Bedford Hill?
Elizabeth Lea

16 June 2018

As a regular cyclist around Putney I frequently go the 'wrong' way down the many narrow one way streets off Putney High Street. I don't do this as a short cut but because I feel safer. Going the 'right' way on a narrow road cars come up behind and want to squeeze past - and we know who will get hurt if case something goes wrong! Going the 'wrong' way I can see the oncoming cars and I either move to the side of the road if possible, or simply stop to let them pass. In this situation I do think the obligation should be on the cyclist to give way (to cars, cyclists, pedestrians or whatever)
Tony

16 June 2018

Trinity Crescent seems a bad choice for this experiment. It is extremely narrow and full of large parked cars. It also has a road entering it half way down, and a school mid way. And a very tricky right hand turn from Balham high road.
Georgina shaw

16 June 2018

I can't get my head round the complaints to this scheme. If people are cycling the wrong way down these streets, then surely this scheme IS needed. It shows there is a demand for the scheme, and that proper signage is needed to make the road safer. Furthermore, can we please see the bigger picture. 9,000 people die each year in London. 9,000, each year. Surely we should be doing anything we can to encourage people to get around win ways that do not pollute. A private car sat in traffic is polluting the air, making the roads slower for everyone, and is bad for everyone's health. If you want cleaner air, less congestion, less noise, cheaper travel options, and a healthier population, then support these schemes and more.
Tom Corbett

16 June 2018

Why do so many people hate cyclists, its great exercise and good for the environment. Walking is too slow to get anything done. The more energy we put into making the borough cycle friendly the better, starting with the Commons, sharing space with pedestrians. Sensible cycling should be encouraged, reckless or fast cycling should be punished.
simon

15 June 2018

So why change the habits of a lifetime? Cyclists where they feel like, in the direction they feel like, on pavement and road, without giving a flying fig towards the Highway Code, the law, or asnything but their own selfish needs!
John Gallagher

15 June 2018

Since when have cyclists obeyed the rules of the road anyway?
Alison

15 June 2018

A lot of people cannot cycle - those who are old, disabled, have prams, pushchairs, dogs, maybe unfit or lazy. However, they do not walk enough and they should be encouraged to walk more. Increasing facilities for cyclists does not help these people. Cyclists break the rules so often, travel the wrong way on one-way streets, cycle on pedestrian walkways and pavements, cross red lights, are often angry and insulting - all of which are terrible for people just walking along. First - encourage walking!
Madeleine

15 June 2018

I welcome these trials and would be interested to see how they’re going to be assessed. My personal experience, as a pedestrian, is that cyclists often choose which is the most favourable set of rules for them - whether vehicular or pedestrian - so to have a separate set of rules is an interesting alternative. I’d assume that these changes are well flagged in the local area, so neither drivers nor pedestrians - nor cyclists - are surprised?
Caroline

15 June 2018

This is an excellent idea to increase the options for cyclists to choose safe quiet routes. It should be remembered by car drivers complaining about this that the only reason there was a need to make the roads one-way in the first place was because car parking made the roads too narrow for cars to pass each other. At least this scheme redresses the balance back slightly in favour of other road users
Sean Hodges

15 June 2018

I am sorry but I do not see the point as most cyclists already do this. On occasions I have seen cyclists going up Wandsworth high street against the traffic. High time you stopped wasting money on cyclists and put it to better use.
Matthew Brooks

15 June 2018

This is a scheme which would be beneficial to the 50m section of Harbut Road between Nantes Close and St John's Hill Grove. This would open a safer east to west route for cyclists avoiding St John's Hill to the south and York Road to the north. This is already in use by many cyclist who are either confused by the right of way (there is a "cut through path" for west to east flow) or ignoring it.
Charlie Edwards

15 June 2018

I consider this to be an ill advised scheme. Of these roads I am most familiar with Trinity Crescent. There may be a lower volume of traffic compared with some roads but it is by no means a quiet road. In addition there is a nursery half way down and so the road attracts a lot of traffic at certain times of day. The road is also narrow compared with many busier roads. It seems totally unsuitable for this "experiment" and I can forsee many a confrontation between cars and cyclists.
Yvonne Panton

15 June 2018