Check your heart age

Published: Monday 12th February 18

February is Heart Month, and the council’s public health team is urging Wandsworth residents to check their heart age.

Heart disease is a leading cause of death in Wandsworth, but there are many things you can do to look after your heart, including staying active, eating well, not smoking and not drinking too much alcohol.  Visit the council’s One You page for links to local services that can help you.

Public Health England has a quick quiz you can do to check how healthy your heart is. Enter details about your age, weight and health and you will be given your ‘heart age’. If your heart age is higher than your actual age there is advice on how to reduce it .

Take the test

Residents are also encouraged to have an NHS health check. If you are aged between 40 and 74 you can get this done by your GP. All you need to do is call your GP and tell them you would like an NHS Health Check. Find out more about NHS Healthchecks.

The council’s health spokesman Cllr Paul Ellis said: “Our public health department runs and commissions a wide range of free services that can help you keep fit and active and help keep your heart healthy, including a stop smoking service and health trainers.

“Keep an eye on your health and find out about the support available to you if you need it.”

Find out more about the British Heart Foundation’s Heart Month.

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Recent comments

Dear Brian Knapton, you are certainly not the only person to query the age limit of 74, and in reposes to your comment wondering it people just hope we will do the decent thing and die, just listen out for the phrase "the problem is that people are living longer". This will then be swiftly followed up by the afterthought "and of course we are very pleased about that". Unconscious bias is absolutely rife, which is surprising given how enlightened so many people like to think they are today compared with their parents or grandparents. Unfortunately even with the finely honed sensitivities which prevail today, they only exist in certain areas - no one seems to know that agesim is just as illegal (and abhorrent) as sexism or racism.
Janis Humberstone

9 March 2018

I see that I am not the only one to query why those over 74 are excluded from heart/age test. Perhaps the hope is that we all die soon!
Brian Knapton

26 February 2018

I heard via the news the other day that Wandsworth is planning to ban certain activities on their commons e.g. kite flying, tree climbing, informal football and cricket. I mostly use Tooting Common and am appalled at the idea that children will be prohibited from doing these normal and natural activities, which help them in so many ways: excercise, coordination, encouraging a spirit of adventure, to mention just a few. Please tell me this is false rumour and not for real!
Ann Brimelow

19 February 2018

I agree with the 2 earlier commentators. Why is no one over the age of 74 entitled to a health check? Is the assumption made that everyone over that age is in the doctors surgery all the time anyway so does not need a check up? There have been cases in the European Court challenging the different treatment of men and women in certain service offerings, if the criterion is based on gender (even when, actuarially, there are facts to support the case for differing treatment) so how come a different service offering based solely upon age (not health or frequency of GP/hospital visits) is apparently legal ???
Janis Humberstone

19 February 2018

I agree with the 2 earlier commentators. Why is no one over the age of 74 entitled to a health check? Is the assumption made that everyone over that age is in the doctors surgery all the time anyway so does not need a check up? There have been cases in the European Court challenging the different treatment of men and women in certain service offerings, if the criterion is based on gender (even when, actuarially, there are facts to support the case for differing treatment) so how come a different service offering based solely upon age (not health or frequency of GP/hospital visits) is apparently legal ???
Janis Humberstone

19 February 2018

What about people over 74 ? we have a hart and is kicking.
Inigo Verastegui

16 February 2018

Why do such checks end at age 74? Is one past saving after that age? Because one's not worth it? Yours, disgruntled older woman
Gillian Wightwick

12 February 2018