Comment now on cycling strategy

Published: Friday 17th July 15

A new draft strategy that aims to make cycling in the borough safer and more popular has been officially published.

The public can now comment on the draft plan, which is designed to make Wandsworth a part of London where people increasingly choose to cycle and where cycling is championed as a great way to travel.

Read the draft strategy.

Take part in the online consultation.

The strategy builds on previous and existing programmes which have already led to cycling becoming more popular and widespread locally. It aims to increase cycling, make it safer and to normalise cycling as an everyday travel choice

There are 22 targets for action, split into four key categories – improving infrastructure, planning, help to cycle and awareness.

Included in the 22 targets are:

  • A review of the borough cycle route network – to develop a programme of cycle route improvements so that they cater for many different types of cyclists
  • Implement Quietways - Utilise less busy streets and off-road corridors to create new routes
  • Cycle parking - improve the amount, type and location and include in public spaces as well as residential areas.
  • Cycle training - provide free to people who live, work or study in the borough, including children and adults, covering a range of abilities.  
  • Improve road user behaviour - working with the police and other agencies to encourage safe and responsible use of routes by all road users.
  • Reduce conflict between cyclists and HGVs – by supporting activities that reduce conflict between lorries and cyclists, including provision of Safer Urban Driver training and promotion of “exchanging places” events.

Transport spokesman Cllr Jonathan Cook said: “We want to encourage people to cycle more and where possible to think of it as their primary means of getting around. This is good for health reasons, for air quality and for reducing transport congestion. 

“We are asking people to comment and add in their suggestions as to how we can raise participation levels even higher.”

 

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Recent comments

Cycling reduces congestion and pollution, and helps us all be healthier. Cyclists pay road tax like everyone else through general taxation, and are often motorists as well as cyclists. They're normal people, who behave as well, or as selfishly, on the roads as any one else. To make it easier for more of us to cycle, Wandsworth needs to introduce properly segregated cycle lanes, so people feel safe, on good, direct routes. And proper locked, covered bike hangers, so it's easier to own and use a bike. We need the Council to be bold, and choose a couple of local town centres for a ground-breaking, dutch-style road layout, to show they mean it when they tell us to get on our bikes.
Cycling granny

21 September 2015

Why does the Council,Mayor for London etc. constantly need to promote cycling.There is plenty of Public Transport available for people use in London to get around.What are they going to do with all the empty buses which are already under used???
SD

21 August 2015

I think cyclist should be banned from certain roads. The item in this weeks evening paper talking of banning HGVs during rush hours is nonsense. Cyclists can get to where ever they are going by public transport - and make no money for the economy - and they will still manage to put themselves under the wheels of other motorists. HGVs have no other ways of delivering their products - and make money for the economy. Having said this - some control over the size of lorries within the M25 should be taken - our old Victorian roads can't cope with their size. The ever increasing size of buses, taxis and private cars is also not suitable for our old fashioned roads.
Elizabeth Denton

8 August 2015

I think cyclist should be banned from certain roads. The item in this weeks evening paper talking of banning HGVs during rush hours is nonsense. Cyclists can get to where ever they are going by public transport - and make no money for the economy - and they will still manage to put themselves under the wheels of other motorists. HGVs have no other ways of delivering their products - and make money for the economy. Having said this - some control over the size of lorries within the M25 should be taken - our old Victorian roads can't cope with their size. The ever increasing size of buses, taxis and private cars is also not suitable for our old fashioned roads.
Elizabeth Denton

8 August 2015

Who is responsible for the removal of the large notice giving "Advanced Warning of a Cycling Event on 2nd of August", still on display today, August 7th in Tooting Broadway?
E.Hodges

7 August 2015

I am in favour of cycling as a great form of transport but I also ride a motorbike and drive cars and larger vehicles daily in central London and see cyclists flouting the highway code on a massive scale ignoring traffic signs,lights ,pedestrians and other road users. They seem to think that they are able to mount the pavement at will and just generally do what they like. Why can't they be required to have insurance and perhaps road tax as well as some form of VRM like other road users and also proof that they have passed a test before they are allowed to ride on the road.
Douglas

19 July 2015

All roads users need to recognise that the highway is a shared area, and by designing cycle routes that use "quiet roads" and back streets merely reinforces the view that cycling is both a second rate mode of transport and hinders other road users. Furthermore, by using back streets the utility of cycling as purpose to move from a to b is reduced. Vehicle drivers have the view repeated that cyclists need to be "out of their way." The ASL are rarely regulated and often stopped in by car drivers, when they are provided. The simple step of adding an ASL at all stops and an element of policing them would improve the amenity of cycling. Cycle routes that can be parked on or just stop when it gets too hard for the designers need to be addressed.
John

18 July 2015

Training, and provision of half-hearted routes through little back streets has been tried, and hasn't produced enough change. Cycling needs to be seen as mainstream, with serious segregated provision on direct routes to main hubs. We should be planning at least for a North-South, and an East-West route through the borough. I am sure that the will now exists to make this happen. A more detailed response to this proposal will follow!
Olivia

18 July 2015