Pristine new paving laid on Putney Bridge

Release date: Thursday 28th August 14

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The Putney Bridge repair project continues to gather pace with hundreds of yards of pristine new paving stones laid this week on the western footpath.

And this week also saw the conclusion of the operation to retrieve six large granite blocks from the riverbed after they were sent tumbling into the Thames when a bus crashed into the bridge at the beginning of July.   

The new walkway in action

The damaged blocks are now being repaired by specialist stonemasons and will shortly be reattached to the bridge’s parapet wall.

Work is now commencing to waterproof and refurbish the pavement on the eastern side of the bridge. This means it has been possible to open up a wider walkway for pedestrians and cyclists to cross the centre of the bridge. This change is making it much easier and less crowded for people who need to cross the river.

Other works carried out this week have included the installation of new access ladders deep within the bridge structure to enable future maintenance and inspections to be carried out safely and easily.  

Engineers are also continuing the refurbishment works to the subway at its northern end, while work continues off-site to refurbish the bridge‘s ornate Victorian lamp columns which are being restored by specialist craftsmen.

Transport spokesman Cllr Jonathan Cook said: “People who cross the bridge each day can see for themselves the scale of the works that are being carried out and the speed with which they are proceeding. 

Retrieving the granite blocks from the foreshore

“Since day one we have been determined to do a really excellent repair job to this bridge, but to also do it as quickly, efficiently and as cost-effectively as possible. There has been absolutely no let up in our efforts to achieve these important goals.

“As things stand now we remain firmly on course to meet our target of completing the job in October.”

For more information contact the Wandsworth Council press team at press@wandsworth.gov.uk.

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Recent comments

Nice job on the bridge!
Bryan Corbett

11 September 2014

Obviously well done to the Council for requiring an efficient timetable for the repairs and the good news of an earlier than anticipated finish. However another two weeks for completion which involves mostly pavement construction, surely indicates an even better plan would have involved total closure up to say this point and then partial opening to traffic thereafter. Pavement work could proceed in steps. I also note the rapid completion of two lanes to enable the London-Surrey cycle race riders to cross at Putney, which indicates that a partial shutdown followed by phased reopening would have been possible.
david allison

11 September 2014

But no-one can walk on the new pavement and still cyclists think they can weave amongst pedestrians. No police or TFL people there to help on this busy Saturday afternoon - busy with football crowds as well as shoppers.
Celia Blair

30 August 2014

I used the railway bridge at Putney on Wednesday, where cycle ramps have been added. Having found a kind person to carry my 3 year old grandson's pram up the steps (no ramp for prams!)I walked up the steps with him. Up on the bridge it seems there is no sign or anything to stop selfish cyclists riding full tilt across the bridge and I had to drag the toddler out of their way three times. Can anything be done before a child gets hurt?
Sally Abingdon

29 August 2014